ORFC 2022 Advance Supporter Tickets Now Available

ORFC Global 2021

Full Programme

This seven-day programme offers over 150 sessions that have been programmed with partners and farming communities from across six continents.  It includes a mix of talks, panel discussions, workshops and cultural events on everything from farm practice to climate justice to indigenous knowledge. Please take some time to explore!

Please note that although workshops are free to all registered delegates, separate, advance registration is required for all workshops, and spaces are limited. Workshop registration opened to all registered delegates from Tuesday, 29 December 2020 and was sent via email. Register early to avoid disappointment!

View a PDF of the full programme here

View a printable PDF programme here

Please note the times in the online programme below should display in your local time zone.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Qiana Mickie

Ariel Molina

Veikko Heintz

Chair

Judith Hitchman

Languages

English, Français

15:00 - 16:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) for Food Justice: A Global Perspective

CSA groups have sometimes been labelled as middle class. And although sociological studies show that it is true that many CSA members have a background of higher education, the essence of community supported agriculture is to back local organic/agroecological farmers, be inclusive and build social cohesion. CSA farms using agroecological practices are conscious of their key role in providing healthy, nutritious food for all while preserving soil health and agrobiodiversity.

There are a wide range of solidarity mechanisms that are implemented by CSA farms and groups around the world. The COVID-19 crisis contributed to casting a light on some of them: solidarity funds to offer shares to marginalized people, sliding schemes allowing members to pay a price that is proportional to the income, bidding rounds based on voluntary financial contributions and working shares, amongst them.

How efficient are all these techniques in making CSA more inclusive? How can farmers and consumers participate in the social inclusion efforts? In extremely different contexts, CSAs have developed ad hoc strategies to bridge the gap between different segments of our societies. This session will tell stories from the ground from three different continents.

Farm Practice
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Nigel Adams

Louis Dolmans

Jim Jones

Chair

Dr Jo Staley

Languages

English

15:00 - 16:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Hedgerows: An International Perspective

This session will explore the many facets of hedgerows, from wildlife habitat to cultural history, from ecosystem services to ecological resilience.

Nigel Adams and Dr Jo Staley from the UK introduce the importance of hedgerows, their roles in agricultural landscapes and current policy relevance. They will outline the contribution that hedgerows can make to nature conservation along with the many ecosystem services that they provide, and the importance of sensitive management to guarantee their survival into the future. 

Colleagues in Canada and The Netherlands will present their own very different hedgerow stories: from a country that has never had hedges to one that almost completely lost them.

Workshop

Chair

Verónica Villa

Languages

English, Español

15:00 - 16:30 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Activist-Exchange: Sharing Strategies to Take Back Control of the Future

ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED. LIMITED SPACES: 250

How can we bring about people’s control of technology? How can grassroots activists and popular movements take on the might of corporations who wish to impose new technologies on us? This workshop session, in collaboration with ETC Group, is an opportunity for activists from different communities around the world to connect and learn from each other’s experiences in struggles about technologies in the food system. What were the lessons for current times that can be learnt from opposing Terminator Technology in the early 2000’s? How can popular movements shape those future technologies that might affect them? The discussion will start with a description of work by the Latin America Network for the Social Assessment of Technology (TECLA) by Verónica Villa.

Panel Discussion
16:00 - 17:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Agroecological, Regenerative and Organic: Complementary or Competing Approaches to Food System Transformation?

It is now widely accepted that fundamental changes are needed across the food system to address the climate emergency, food insecurity, tackle an escalating global public health crisis, and ensure resilient livelihoods for food and farm workers. Over recent decades, agroecology has risen to meet the challenge, offering a holistic framework to address current food systems’ environmental, social and economic failings. At the same time, the steady growth of the organic market has made a strong impact on the global development of standards and regulatory requirements. Additional – and occasionally competing – approaches, such as regenerative agriculture, ecological organic agriculture and others have also increasingly been taken up in different regions of the world.

This session, organised by the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems (IPES-Food) will discuss the contributions of agroecology and other approaches to the development of sustainable food systems. It will particularly consider what could be common principles across these various approaches to sustainable food systems development, and recognize the dangers of ‘greenwashing’ and ‘co-optation’ of terms in the ongoing global debates on the future of agriculture and food.

Farm Practice
Panel Discussion
16:00 - 17:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

The Global Grassfed Alliance: A New Community Seeking to Establish Credibility and Consistency for Grass-fed Produce Around the World

Join the recently-formed Global Grassfed Alliance to hear about a growing international movement of people and organisations championing the production of grass-fed meat and milk from regenerative farming systems. The session will be a dialogue between members of the alliance working with different geographic constraints and increasing public interest the world over.

The Global Grassfed Alliance (of which the UK’s Pasture-Fed Livestock Association, host of this session, is a member) is in the early stages of development but already common ground is emerging between countries and organisations, and a strong need to establish an international understanding of what “grass-fed” means. Done right, grass-fed production can deliver so many benefits for society, improving animal, human and planetary health, but, unless protected, it could become “grasswash”.

Who are the organisations and people working to champion this work and what can be done to encourage greater international collaboration between them? This session will bring together some of the best examples from around the world, from well-established organisations to those just starting out.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Tchenna Fernades Maso

Federico Pacheco

Gerardo Reyes Chavez

Chair

Adam Payne

Languages

English, Español

17:00 - 18:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Workers’ Power: Taking on the Multinationals

As power in the food system is increasingly globalised and concentrated, we need strategies to hold corporations to account for the human rights abuses taking place in the fields growing produce that supply our supermarket shelves, and improve the working conditions or agricultural labourers. Join us and hear from leaders discussing social movement strategies to mobilise workers power to defend their rights in the face of multinationals in the food and agriculture system.

In this session, we will hear from the USA Coalition of Immokalee Workers and how they have reduced exploitation, improved pay and instituted union led standards and audits by public mobilisation against the companies that ultimately benefit and control the market they supply. We will also hear about the Binding Treaty on Transnational Corporations. With LVC members in Europe, we will also discuss ways in which these models can be implemented in European supply chains that rely on the exploitation of migrant labour.

Panel Discussion
17:00 - 18:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Transformation of Our Food Systems: The Need for a Paradigm Shift

“Business as usual is not an option” – the global report by the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD), published in 2009, came to a clear and straightforward conclusion. More than a decade later, decisive action is no longer “an option;” it’s an imperative. The COVID-19 pandemic has moreover laid bare the inequities, system failures and dangers of today’s dominant, globalized and increasingly corporatized food and agriculture systems that have concentrated profits in the hands of a few, while simultaneously driving global climate, biodiversity and health crises towards their tipping points. Today’s multiple accelerating crises demand transformative change. Ample evidence now exists that such change is not only possible but is already happening on the ground in communities and countries around the world.

In this session, we look at how food system narratives have evolved in recent times, what key barriers still need to be overcome to achieve a profound paradigm shift, and what action is needed to accelerate food system transformation.

Farm Practice
Workshop

Speakers

Leopold Rittler

Mike Mallett

Dr. Florian Leiber

Chair

Jerry Alford

Languages

English

17:00 - 18:30 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Feeding Pigs and Poultry on Regionally Produced and Organic Feed

ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED. LIMITED SPACES: 500

The workshop will look at on-farm alternatives to soya as a protein source and alternative soya products not associated with deforestation.

Feeding pigs and poultry entirely on organic and regionally sourced feed is a long-held ambition of many organic and agroecological farmers. OK-Net EcoFeed, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 scheme, is helping them achieve this goal.

In this workshop, we look at two systems which could replace soya as a protein source: insects and duckweed, and we hear from a farmer aiming to produce eggs from a soya free diet in the UK. 

We also explore the potential for European soya to be used as an alternative to US and South American soya bean meal, reducing emissions associated with transport while growing soya on existing arable land and without causing deforestation.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Nonhle Mbutha

Chair

Mariana Gómez Soto

Languages

English, Français

18:00 - 19:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

The Right to Say No: Defending Our Lands and Livelihoods

Leader of the Amadiba Crisis Committee (ACC), Nonhle Mbuthuma, share’s her farming community’s struggle to defend their ancestral land from Mineral’s Resources Limited, (MRC) an Australian mining company with British investment. The people of Xolobeni town, on the Wild Coast of South Africa, fought for many years against the proposed gold mine and finally succeeded with their “Right to Say No” campaign in 2016. The proposed mine would have destroyed a 22km area of the Amadiba people’s riparian and coastal lands, polluting the waters upon which the community depends for their food and livelihoods..

The ACC wrote petitions, protested and created blockades along the coastline but the resistance was met with deadly violence when the previous chairman, Sikosiphi ”Bazooka’ Rhadebe, was murdered. Stepping up to lead her community, Nonhle, continually risked her life to keep the mining companies out but while they defeated MRC the threat never goes away. Now the South African government are looking to push through new mining contracts, without consultation, to help with its new Covid economic regeneration plan.

An incredible land defender, Nonhle, is now at the forefront of a campaign uniting communities across Southern Africa to assert their Right to Say No to unwanted mining. She will be interviewed by Colombian activist, Mariana Gomez Soto, who works with communities in similar situations in the Amazon.