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ORFC Global 2021

Full Programme

This seven-day programme offers over 150 sessions that have been programmed with partners and farming communities from across six continents.  It includes a mix of talks, panel discussions, workshops and cultural events on everything from farm practice to climate justice to indigenous knowledge. Please take some time to explore!

Please note that although workshops are free to all registered delegates, separate, advance registration is required for all workshops, and spaces are limited. Workshop registration opened to all registered delegates from Tuesday, 29 December 2020 and was sent via email. Register early to avoid disappointment!

View a PDF of the full programme here

View a printable PDF programme here

Please note the times in the online programme below should display in your local time zone.

Farm Practice
Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Rupert Dunn
Jean-Marc Albisetti
Rosy Benson

Chair

Michel Pimbert

Languages

English

14:00 - 15:30 GMT
Thursday, 5 January 2023

Living Bread: The way of the peasant baker

‘We consider bread and agricultural products as spiritual nourishment and physically vital as well as emotionally, culturally and spiritually healing.” (Panis Vita)  The peasant baker is someone who grows, mills and bakes with landrace heritage grains on a small scale. It is a model which combines tradition and innovation, producing the best possible quality of bread from nutritionally dense grains. During this session we will be hearing from Rupert Dunn, Jean-Marc Albisetti, who have run…

Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Daniel Piovesan do Nascimento
Roz Corbett
Nick Lunch
Emma Cardwell

Chair

Oli Rodker

Languages

English

Format

Video

14:00 - 15:30 GMT
Thursday, 5 January 2023

Struggles for Land Justice: Sharing strategies from the UK, Brazil and East Africa

A long history of land enclosure both here in the UK and globally has left a legacy of deep societal disconnection from the land, and denied countless communities their right to pursue land-based livelihoods. But just as mass land dispossessions and the creeping enclosure of the commons are phenomena that are still ongoing today, the struggles for land justice and reclaiming our connection to the land are equally widespread. This session will shine a light…

Lunchtime Talk
Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Vandana Shiva
Charles Dowding
Ruby Reed
Christabel Reed

Languages

English

Format

Video

14:00 GMT
Thursday, 5 January 2023

Ecosystem Restoration and Agroecology through Online Learning

The UN reports that the only way we can meet the global target of 1 billion restored hectares in the next eight years and avoid ecosystem collapse is to support people across the world to engage in localised ecosystem restoration. Join this lunchtime session and explore how we can leverage online learning to support a peer-driven, participatory global ecosystem restoration movement.

Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Ben Andrews

Sarah Compson

Sarah Hathway

Jake Freestone

Guy Singh-Watson

Chair

Lee Holdstock

Languages

English

Format

Audio

14:00 GMT
05/01/2023

Growing in Common Ground- What’s needed to make the united visions of organic, regenerative and agroecology flourish?

There is a buzz of excitement forming around new ways of farming sustainably with the idea of a regenerative revolution gaining traction amongst farmers. This new term may sound different, but fundamentally it is very similar to organic, and some principles of each are shared, moving from an extractive to a restorative style of agriculture.

Oxford
Panel Discussion
Workshop

Speakers

Mark Betson

Philip Franses

Marina O’Connell

Jeremy Smith

Chair

Gabriel Kaye

Languages

English

Format

Audio

14:00 GMT
05/01/2023

Biodynamics for Local Food and Nature Restoration: Trialling a model with Diocesian land

Finding land for growing local food, nature restoration and carbon capture is a huge challenge. The Apricot Centre has been given an opportunity to trial an innovative approach, with a tenancy on land owned by the local Exeter Diocese.

Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Alice Cunningham

K. Greene

Shinya Imahashi

Melanie Knight

Chair

Ben Raskin

Languages

English

Format

Audio

14:00 GMT
05/01/2023

Seed-Saving: Preserving biodiversity, strengthening resilience and promoting healthy diets

The urgently needed transition to agroecology begins with seed and soil. This transition is only possible with policies and efforts to support and recognise native seeds.

Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Deborah Barker

Christine Meadows

Fidelity Weston

Fergus Henderson

Chair

Jimmy Woodrow

Languages

English

Format

Audio

14:00 GMT
05/01/2023

The Role of Farmer-Farmer Mentoring in the Agricultural Transition

In the spectrum of services farmers can access to help them transition to regenerative practices, where does mentoring fit? Often overlooked or poorly executed, does mentoring have a place alongside other services farmers access to support their practice?

Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Lord Deben

Fabrizio Albanito

Chair

Lord Teverson

Languages

English

Format

Audio, PDF

14:00 GMT
05/01/2023

UK Climate Change Committee Assesses the Role of Agroecological Farming in the Transition to Net Zero

For the first time, UK policymakers are actively researching the potential for agroecology to help deliver net zero. In Spring 2022, the Climate Change Committee (CCC) commissioned the University of Aberdeen to review a range of agroecological farm practices – such as reduced and minimum tillage, leys, extensive livestock systems and cropping approaches – and assess their impact on GHG emissions, vegetation and soil carbon stocks, and changes to yields.

Oxford
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Vicki Hird

Tim Lang

Anna Taylor

Dee Woods

Chair

Tim Benton

Languages

English

Format

Audio

14:00 GMT
05/01/2023

Should the UK Grow More Food? An open forum on the state of UK food security

What’s the state of UK food security and should we be growing more food in the UK? In December 2021, the UK government published the first of its new triennial Food Security Reports. This painted a picture which could either reassure or concern us.