ORFC Global 2021 Exhibition Hall Now Live!

ORFC Global 2021

Full Programme

This seven-day programme offers over 150 sessions that have been programmed with partners and farming communities from across six continents.  It includes a mix of talks, panel discussions, workshops and cultural events on everything from farm practice to climate justice to indigenous knowledge. Please take some time to explore!

Please note that although workshops are free to all registered delegates, separate, advance registration is required for all workshops, and spaces are limited. Workshop registration opened to all registered delegates from Tuesday, 29 December 2020 and was sent via email. Register early to avoid disappointment!

View a PDF of the full programme here

View a printable PDF programme here

Please note the times in the online programme below should display in your local time zone.

Keynote

Speakers

Frances Moore Lappé

Chair

Baroness Rosie Boycott

Languages

English, Español

20:00 - 21:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

Food and Democracy

Frances Moore Lappe’s bestselling book, Diet for a Small Planet was published in 1971 and taught America the social and personal significance of a new way of eating. Today, it remains just as relevant, exploring such critical themes as the connection between food and democracy.

Sharing her personal evolution and how this groundbreaking book changed her own life, world-renowned food expert Frances Moore Lappé offers ORFC delegates the opportunity to share in her experiences of meeting farmers and food producers around the world. And what the last 50 years have taught her.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Tammi Jones

Rob Wallace

Chair

Ian Rappel

Languages

English

21:00 - 22:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

Can Agriculture Stop COVID-21, 22, and 23?

Pathogens are repeatedly emerging out of a global agrifood system rooted in inequality, labour exploitation, and unfettered extractivism by which communities are robbed of their natural and social resources. In response, some propose agricultural intensification under the guise of sparing ‘wilderness’ – an approach that actually leads to greater deforestation and disease spillover. The false solution to divide people from nature would omit many forms of peasant, Indigenous, and smallholder agriculture methods that are integrated within forest ecosystems and produce food and fibre for local and regional uses while preserving high levels of agrobiodiversity and wildlife diversity.

Pandemic Research for the People (PReP) is focusing on how agriculture might be reimagined as the kind of community-wide intervention that could stop coronaviruses and other pathogens from emerging in the first place. We advocate for agroecology, an environmentalism of the peasantry, the poor, and Indigenous, long in practice, that treats agriculture as a part of the ecology out of which humanity grows its food. A diverse agroecological matrix of farm plots, agroforestry, and grazing lands all embedded within a forest can conserve biocultural diversity, making it more difficult for zoonotic diseases to easily string together a bunch of infections and prevail, while accounting for the economic and social conditions of people currently tending the land.

Peasant agroecologies are more than matters of soil and food, as important as those are. Agroecologies are founded upon practical politics that place agency and power in the hands of poor and working class, Indigenous, and Black and Brown people. They replace the dynamics of ecologically harmful forms of urbanization and agricultural industrialization operating in favour of a racial and patriarchal capitalism. They place planet and people before profits none but a few reap.

Farm Practice
Panel Discussion
12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Reaching Net Zero with Nature Friendly Solutions

Working towards Net Zero to reduce global warming has well and truly arrived for us all and is even more important now as we strive to reach Government targets and look to the possible new requirements and structures of future farming payment schemes. Farmers are key and incredibly well placed to help deliver this globally through a range of changes and options for their farming practices.

This session on reaching Net Zero or even Sub-Zero by using nature friendly solutions brings you practical ways to help achieve this on your farm. A panel of farmers from across the UK will share their work and experiences in the delivery of achievable Net Zero practices and will highlight the most recent thinking work on this. As well as presentations, you will have an opportunity to put questions to the panel.

Panel Discussion
12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Farmer Managed Seed Systems in Africa

Farmer Managed Seed Systems (FMSS) have, for hundreds of years, played a crucial role across the African continent in ensuring a diverse diet for millions of people and sustaining biodiversity. However, there is no continental law governing seeds in Africa and corporates have taken this as an opportunity to grab resources from the agricultural sector - which still occupies 70 % of the population into Africa - and sell them seed, fertilizers and pesticides. In some regions various stakeholders such as seed companies and their allies, are promoting uniformity in the name of high yield seed and food security.

Despite the push of multiple legal-political instruments to install industrial seed systems as the vehicle of African agriculture, 80% of seeds used by farmers in Africa come from their own reserves. In this panel, organised by AFSA, we will learn about two levels of resistance to the African seeds takeover by industry: first is led by civil society organisations at sub regional level, engaging the push of seed law revision favourable to hybrid seeds and GMO’s. Second is at national levels where farmers’ organisations break the law by organising seed festivals; sharing indigenous seed, knowledge and practices.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Finn Cottle

Wilma Finlay

Rob Haward

Chair

Sophie Kirk

Languages

English

13:00 - 14:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

The Organic Market: Building Resilience

COVID-19, Brexit and economic disruption are changing the UK sustainable food and drink markets, presenting new opportunities and challenges for organic farmers. This session outlines emerging trends and explores how farm businesses are adapting to build resilience in a time of change.

A changing world provides new opportunities and challenges for organic farmers.

Drawing on robust organic market trend data, and featuring speakers from flagship organic farm businesses, this session offers valuable insight into the performance of, and outlook for, the organic food and farming sector. It provides opportunities to see what these farm businesses are doing in response to an uncertain and changing market.

Hosted by Soil Association Certification and featuring speakers from Riverford, and The Ethical Dairy, we explore how organic operators are adapting their businesses and routes to market to maximise opportunities and build resilience into their sustainable food and drink markets.

Workshop

Speakers

Chiara Tornaghi

Michiel Dehaene

Languages

English

13:00 - 14:30 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Building Farmers’ Capacity in the Context of Urbanisation: Political Pedagogies for Urban Agroecology

ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED. LIMITED SPACES: 50

Farmer-to-farmer learning is a pillar of the food sovereignty and agroecology movements, enabling territorially-specific learning and alliance-building to support farmers’ livelihoods and broader socio-political transformations. Most accounts of experiences in this field are based on rural contexts and rural farm models. However, the broadening food sovereignty and agroecology movement is also reaching out to urban and peri-urban farmers, some of whom were once rural and found themselves absorbed by expanding urbanisation. Their livelihoods are affected by specific problems of neoliberal urbanisation: speculative land markets and gentrification impacting access to land and housing; erosion, pollution, and destruction of living soils; degradation of riverways; fragmentation of farmland and progressive farmers’ isolation from solidarity networks of proximity; lack of farming infrastructure; ongoing deskilling and producers-consumer’s separation.

In this workshop, the organisers would like to hear from farmers and farmers’ movements of any political and practical training, strategising and learning initiatives that they have/are developing, to address these specific ‘urban’ challenges. This session aims to contribute to the co-creation of a ‘toolbox’ of strategies for shaping a political urban agroecology. The organisers will begin the session sharing some experiences drawn from the www.urbanisinginplace.org project. Participants are encouraged to prepare a 5-10 minute account of their experience.

This session will be of interest to farmers and activists engaged in farmer training and in the support and empowerment of peri-urban and urban agroecological farmers.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Chair

Matt Naylor

Languages

English

13:00 - 14:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

The Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill (CEE Bill): Can It Transform Food Systems?

We cannot prevent climate and ecological breakdown without radical change to the food we eat and how it is produced. The IPCC Special Report on Land Use shows the extent of change required to restore natural carbon sinks, to help mitigate against temperature rises of 2 degrees and beyond, and adapt to avoid the worst impacts such as flooding and food shortages.

The CEE Bill lays out a pathway for the creation of a strategy to deal with the Climate and Ecological Emergency, in line with the UK’s Paris Agreement 1.5oC commitments. Key points:

The UK Government and UK companies will be accountable for our entire emissions and ecological footprint resulting from all supply chains - international as well as domestic.

The UK Government will be obliged to protect and restore UK ecosystems to reverse the decline in biodiversity and crucially to protect and restore ecosystems that are of critical importance to help mitigate and adapt to climate change: our natural carbon sinks - peatlands, woodlands, soil, grasslands, wetlands as well as the oceans.

Our panel explores how this strategy might work in practice, in the creation of pathways to a fair and just transition to a zero carbon food system and a thriving natural world.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Jo Jandai

Chris Newman

Languages

English, Español

14:00 - 15:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Democratising Food Sovereignty: An Intimate Look at Decentralized, Diversified and Democratized Food System Action

To understand food sovereignty, we must understand the current issue of power at the root of our food system. Indigenous leaders, Chris Newman and Jo Jandi not only recognise the centralisation of power but are also actively working to redistribute power in their local communities. How? By democratising and embedding food sovereignty into our food system. Chris brings his experience from Sylvanaqua Farms in the Northern Neck of Virginia, and Jo Jandi brings his experience with the Pun Pun Center for Self-Reliance and Thamturakit in Northern Thailand. The two are finding ways to address the local nuances that come with being in different places while finding common ground as they’re still fighting the same battle against the domination of industrial agriculture. With Chris’ focus on securing land for Indigenous and Black-American farmers, and Jo Jandai’s work to fight against neoliberal policies, the two will be able to share in their common experience and learn from one another.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Johanna Saxler

Petra Tas

Oli Rodker

Tanguy Martin

Chair

Phil Moore

Languages

English, Français

14:00 - 15:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Access to Land: Case Studies from Western Europe

This session will hear from four projects in Western Europe pioneering ways of providing access to land for ecological food production and new entrant farmers. We’ll learn of different business models used in the UK, Germany, Belgium and France to inspire different models across the world and give insights into the context in which these projects operate and the practicalities of making them work.