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ORFC Global 2023 4 – 6 January Book Tickets

ORFC Global 2021

Full Programme

This seven-day programme offers over 150 sessions that have been programmed with partners and farming communities from across six continents.  It includes a mix of talks, panel discussions, workshops and cultural events on everything from farm practice to climate justice to indigenous knowledge. Please take some time to explore!

Please note that although workshops are free to all registered delegates, separate, advance registration is required for all workshops, and spaces are limited. Workshop registration opened to all registered delegates from Tuesday, 29 December 2020 and was sent via email. Register early to avoid disappointment!

View a PDF of the full programme here

View a printable PDF programme here

Please note the times in the online programme below should display in your local time zone.

Cultural Event
12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

Opening Plenary

Opening plenary with speakers and farmers from around the world.

Panel Discussion
13:00 - 14:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

Agroecology Across Three Continents: Showcasing Good Policy Practices

Governments are beginning to recognise the urgent need to transform our food systems. This has been made even more pressing by the current health and economic crisis caused by the COVID pandemic. Currently, there are good but rather scattered examples of governments around the world that have been developing conducive and innovative policies aimed at introducing and implementing agroecological and resilient principles.

Join three leading policymakers from three different countries (India, Denmark and Uganda)…

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Vandana Shiva

Tim Wise

Mariam Mayet

Chair

Languages

English, Français

15:00 - 16:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

Neo-colonial Economies and Ecologies, Smallholder Farmers and Multiple Shocks in Africa: Confronting False Solutions Towards Decolonization

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent crises, as a result of lockdowns, have exposed the fractures of human societies’ relationship with nature. In a world dominated by capitalist globalisation, these crises are not blips or anomalies that require a few tweaks to make the system a little more sustainable. No, it is a forceful reflection of processes that engender the economic, ecological and social crises that already existed.

Key international forums and publications are focusing…

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Stefanie Swanepeol

David Otieno

Chair

Dee Woods

Languages

English, Français

16:00 - 17:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

Food Justice not Food Aid

Access to fresh, affordable, nourishing, locally produced and culturally appropriate food (as well as the fuel to cook it and time to prepare it) should be the guaranteed right of every individual and household. However, global food systems are increasingly dominated by an ‘industrial diet’ where highly processed and low nutrient foods are widely available and most easily accessible. Many countries, including the UK, have shameful levels of food insecurity and diet-related ill health, and…

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Gertrude Pswarayi-Jabson

Amadou Kanouté

Nada Trigui

Chair

Million Belay

Languages

English, Français

18:00 - 19:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

What Kind of Food System Does Africa Need?

Africa faces multiple challenges related to our food systems, including hunger, malnutrition, obesity, noncommunicable diseases, the climate crisis, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, cultural erosion, and other climate related shocks, such as pest and disease outbreaks and escalating prices of external inputs. The COVID-19 pandemic has further exposed the weaknesses of current food systems to meet the needs of African peoples.

These interconnected challenges demand a holistic response, with African civil society and institutions…

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Rikke Grand Olivera

Edie Mukiibi

Chair

Daniel Moss

Languages

English, Français

19:00 - 20:00 GMT
Thursday, 7 January

Moving Money into Agroecology: A Conversation among Donors Supporting Agroecology

Too much investment flowing into agriculture is perverse – shoring up inequitable food systems that grow an ever narrower range of foods and exacerbate climate change. Massive public and private investments in agroecological food systems and agroecological movements are urgently needed – investments that align with agroecological principles and don't serve to greenwash investor portfolios. This session will explore why and how philanthropies and bilateral and multilateral development agencies invest in agroecology, both the challenges…

Panel Discussion
12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Farmer Managed Seed Systems in Africa

Farmer Managed Seed Systems (FMSS) have, for hundreds of years, played a crucial role across the African continent in ensuring a diverse diet for millions of people and sustaining biodiversity. However, there is no continental law governing seeds in Africa and corporates have taken this as an opportunity to grab resources from the agricultural sector - which still occupies 70 % of the population into Africa - and sell them seed, fertilizers and pesticides. In…

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Johanna Saxler

Petra Tas

Oli Rodker

Tanguy Martin

Chair

Phil Moore

Languages

English, Français

14:00 - 15:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Access to Land: Case Studies from Western Europe

This session will hear from four projects in Western Europe pioneering ways of providing access to land for ecological food production and new entrant farmers. We’ll learn of different business models used in the UK, Germany, Belgium and France to inspire different models across the world and give insights into the context in which these projects operate and the practicalities of making them work.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Qiana Mickie

Ariel Molina

Veikko Heintz

Chair

Judith Hitchman

Languages

English, Français

15:00 - 16:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) for Food Justice: A Global Perspective

CSA groups have sometimes been labelled as middle class. And although sociological studies show that it is true that many CSA members have a background of higher education, the essence of community supported agriculture is to back local organic/agroecological farmers, be inclusive and build social cohesion. CSA farms using agroecological practices are conscious of their key role in providing healthy, nutritious food for all while preserving soil health and agrobiodiversity.

There are a wide…