ORFC 2022 Advance Supporter Tickets Now Available

ORFC Global 2021

Full Programme

This seven-day programme offers over 150 sessions that have been programmed with partners and farming communities from across six continents.  It includes a mix of talks, panel discussions, workshops and cultural events on everything from farm practice to climate justice to indigenous knowledge. Please take some time to explore!

Please note that although workshops are free to all registered delegates, separate, advance registration is required for all workshops, and spaces are limited. Workshop registration opened to all registered delegates from Tuesday, 29 December 2020 and was sent via email. Register early to avoid disappointment!

View a PDF of the full programme here

View a printable PDF programme here

Please note the times in the online programme below should display in your local time zone.

Cultural Event
Keynote

Speakers

Sam Lee

Languages

English

19:00 - 20:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

An Evening with Sam Lee: Folksongs and Stories from the British Isles

Award-winning inventive singer, folksong collector, conservationist and founder/director of The Nest Collective Sam Lee sings a special show of folksongs inspired by nature and for the Oxford Real Farming Conference.

Singing songs from his repertoire of ancient traditional British folk songs, this concert will dig deep into the numerous stunning songs that connected our forbearers to the land. For 15 years Sam has collected songs from across the UK and Ireland mostly recording the last songs of our indigenous tradition bearers notably from the Irish & Scots Traveller and English Gypsy communities. This oral tradition tells the legacy of our relationship to the natural world and how folk songs have served as devotional means to revere and adore our land and species living on it. Behind every song is a story of how that song carries an ancient wisdom or even a foreknowing of how the land and changes in society have effected the natural order and what that bird or landscape meant to our ancestors.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Jane Davidson

Lyla June

Chair

Leith Sharp

Languages

English

20:00 - 21:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Protecting the Lives and Livelihoods of Future Generations: The Ultimate Challenge?

What needs to be in place to change the behaviour of governments and institutions to encourage long-term thinking? This session will look at the approach adopted in Wales – the introduction of a law to protect future generations – through the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015. Despite global commitments to climate change and biodiversity from UN member states, passing this act in 2015 thrust Wales into the global spotlight as the only country in the world to have a legal mechanism to deliver on the Sustainable Development Goals. Jane Davidson, proposer of the Act and the author of #futuregen: Lessons from a Small Country will debate the key issues with Lyla June, indigenous environmental scientist and community organiser.

The session will be moderated by Leith Sharp, Director and Lead Faculty, Executive Education for Sustainability Leadership, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Cultural Event
Keynote

Speakers

Naima Penniman

Chair

Languages

English, Español

20:00 - 21:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

These Gardens are Blueprints: Sowing the Seeds of Food Justice

At this time of multiple pandemics, of police violence, coronavirus, climate chaos, and unprecedented economic crisis, we are being called to put our food and land sovereignty dreams into deeper practice. Soul Fire Farm is an Afro-Indigenous community farm in New York that raises vegetables, fruit, herbs, eggs and poultry for people living under food apartheid, and is part of a growing movement to uphold everyone’s right to land, honor the people who grow our food, and support farmers of colour.

Combining visual storytelling and poetry, Naima Penniman will share Soul Fire Farm's pandemic-response strategies, including provision gardening in urban centers, a reparations map, and solidarity sharing the harvest through mutual aid networks. She will also uplift other Black-Indigenous-People-of-Colour led organisations and movements, past and present, that are working in collaboration with land for food security, climate resilience, and the health of our ecosystems. Join us to learn how you too can help build a food system based on justice, dignity, and abundance for all members of our community.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Charles Massy

Bruce Pascoe

Chair

Abby Rose

Languages

English

21:00 - 22:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

How Australian First Nations Peoples’ Land and Food Management and Regenerative Agricultural Practices are Closely Aligned

Two best-selling Australian authors, Charles Massy and Bruce Pascoe, discuss the similarities between the indigneous farming practices of Australian First Nations people and regenerative agriculture techniques. They will look at how the Australian First Nations people are revitalising many of their traditional agricultural practices, like farming yam daisies, fire-stick farming, fish and eel farming and also, paludiculture: the cultivation of food and animal resources in wetlands.

Panel Discussion
21:00 - 22:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Rural Youth Forum: What Is the Future for Rural Areas Without Young People?

Migration of young people away from rural areas is taking place across the world, with fragile infrastructure and services cited as some of the key reasons for this demographic shift. Atop of the day-to-day disadvantages that rural youth face, the climate emergency, the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis threaten their futures. How can rural young people be better supported to create the change they wish to see in their rural areas? How can they be encouraged to raise their voices on rural issues? What changes do they think need to keep young people, and attract more to live, work or study in rural areas?

This panel discussion will bring together rural young people from across the world to discuss the realities of being a rural young person, as well as their perspective on what needs to change to transform rural areas and make them inviting and fit for the future.