Volunteer in-person or online at ORFC 2022!

ORFC Global 2021

Full Programme

This seven-day programme offers over 150 sessions that have been programmed with partners and farming communities from across six continents.  It includes a mix of talks, panel discussions, workshops and cultural events on everything from farm practice to climate justice to indigenous knowledge. Please take some time to explore!

Please note that although workshops are free to all registered delegates, separate, advance registration is required for all workshops, and spaces are limited. Workshop registration opened to all registered delegates from Tuesday, 29 December 2020 and was sent via email. Register early to avoid disappointment!

View a PDF of the full programme here

View a printable PDF programme here

Please note the times in the online programme below should display in your local time zone.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Jane Davidson

Lyla June

Chair

Leith Sharp

Languages

English

20:00 - 21:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Protecting the Lives and Livelihoods of Future Generations: The Ultimate Challenge?

What needs to be in place to change the behaviour of governments and institutions to encourage long-term thinking? This session will look at the approach adopted in Wales – the introduction of a law to protect future generations – through the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015. Despite global commitments to climate change and biodiversity from UN member states, passing this act in 2015 thrust Wales into the global spotlight as the only country in the world to have a legal mechanism to deliver on the Sustainable Development Goals. Jane Davidson, proposer of the Act and the author of #futuregen: Lessons from a Small Country will debate the key issues with Lyla June, indigenous environmental scientist and community organiser.

The session will be moderated by Leith Sharp, Director and Lead Faculty, Executive Education for Sustainability Leadership, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Charles Massy

Bruce Pascoe

Chair

Abby Rose

Languages

English

21:00 - 22:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

How Australian First Nations Peoples’ Land and Food Management and Regenerative Agricultural Practices are Closely Aligned

Two best-selling Australian authors, Charles Massy and Bruce Pascoe, discuss the similarities between the indigneous farming practices of Australian First Nations people and regenerative agriculture techniques. They will look at how the Australian First Nations people are revitalising many of their traditional agricultural practices, like farming yam daisies, fire-stick farming, fish and eel farming and also, paludiculture: the cultivation of food and animal resources in wetlands.

Panel Discussion
21:00 - 22:00 GMT
Friday, 8 January

Rural Youth Forum: What Is the Future for Rural Areas Without Young People?

Migration of young people away from rural areas is taking place across the world, with fragile infrastructure and services cited as some of the key reasons for this demographic shift. Atop of the day-to-day disadvantages that rural youth face, the climate emergency, the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis threaten their futures. How can rural young people be better supported to create the change they wish to see in their rural areas? How can they be encouraged to raise their voices on rural issues? What changes do they think need to keep young people, and attract more to live, work or study in rural areas?

This panel discussion will bring together rural young people from across the world to discuss the realities of being a rural young person, as well as their perspective on what needs to change to transform rural areas and make them inviting and fit for the future.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Jennifer Amejja

Edna Kaptoyo

Rita Uwaka

Chair

Gertrude Pswarayi-Jabson

Languages

English, Français

12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Saturday, 9 January

African Women, Agroecology, Food Sovereignty and Community Forestry

Three African women, Jennifer Amejja, Edna Kaptoyo and Rita Uwaka, speak about the importance of women’s cultural, traditional knowledge and practice for food sovereignty, agroecology and community forest management. How they grow nutritious food, use and protect medicinal plants, select and exchange seed, establish vital community seed banks, provide livelihoods and support the local economy. Also how they protect forests, many of which are sacred, and ensure replenishment and restoration of watersheds.

Indigenous women are especially threatened by climate change and biodiversity destruction, yet their intimate knowledge makes them uniquely placed to protect and restore critical ecosystems; strengthen traditional food systems; conserve species; and transmit indigenous knowledge to future generations.

However, industrial plantation agriculture, often supported by governments and finance institutions in developed countries, is fuelling landgrabs, destroying local food systems, and accelerating climate change, biodiversity loss and human rights abuses, especially for women. How should we collectively address this critical issue?

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Wilberforce Laate

Joyce Ebebeinwe

Karen Nekesa

Sena ALOUKA

Chair

Bridget Mugambe

Languages

English, Français

13:00 - 14:00 GMT
Saturday, 9 January

Mainstreaming Agroecology in Africa’s Approach to Climate Change

AFSA is currently facilitating a campaign on mainstreaming agroecology in climate policies in 12 African countries and at the Africa regional level. The campaign includes mobilizing local actors, engaging government and reaching out to the general public through various media outlets. This session will share the experiences from Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya and Togo. Sena Alouka from Togo we will share experiences of youth in rural Togo promoting agroecology for climate action and also share on the success that have resulted in Togo adopting an agroecology policy. From Kenya, Karen Nekesa we will share experiences of working with schools and county governments to promote Agroecology for climate change. Wilberforce Laate will present on the advocacy for climate action in Ghana linking it with Indigenous Knowledge and Culture. From Nigeria Ms. Joyce Ebebeinwe will share the experiences from Nigeria focusing on civil society advocacy to include agroecology into national climate policy amidst the push from industrial agriculture.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Nury Martínez

Paul Nicholson

Chair

Catherine McAndrew

Languages

English, Español

14:00 - 15:00 GMT
Saturday, 9 January

La Via Campesina: The History of the Movement, How We Organise and What We Do

La Via Campesina made history in 1993 with the articulation of a global peasant movement. Since then they have grown to represent over 200 million peasants, small and medium size farmers, landless people, rural women and youth, indigenous people, migrants and agricultural workers from around the world, and have become a leading light in social movements organising for a vision of social and environmental justice. Built on a strong sense of unity, solidarity between these groups, it defends peasant agriculture for food sovereignty as a way to promote social justice and dignity and strongly opposes corporate driven agriculture that destroys social relations and nature.

We will hear from two leaders of La Via Campesina, who will take us back to the early days of the formation of LVC and tell the story of the birth of the movement and how it grew to be the inspiration and force that it is today. This is a history lesson that no farmer or food activist can afford to miss out on.

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Brett Tolley

Irmak Ertör

Thibault Josse

Chair

Joshua Stoll

Languages

English

14:00 - 15:00 GMT
Saturday, 9 January

Community Supported Fisheries: Small-scale Fisheries and Peasant Agriculture, Same Struggles, Similar Solutions

Our oceans are suffering from the ravages of industrial fisheries and gigantic factory ships hovering up fish stocks in record times. A single haul can be as much as 200 tonnes of fish. Not only is this devastating for fish stocks, it also deeply affects small scale coastal fisheries who are in danger of going out of business: no or little fish, low prices and no access to markets.

And just as Community Supported Agriculture has been working for over 50 years in building territorial markets between small-scale farmers and consumers, Community Supported Fisheries have been addressing similar issues, mainly in the USA, but now increasingly in Europe.

This session will illustrate the problems faced by small-scale fisheries and the various solutions provided by direct sales of fish in various forms. It will also explore how CSF and CSA can work together as well as other forms of short supply chains like the Open Food Network, in ensuring that consumers can support small-scale fisheries and access healthy fresh fish.

Panel Discussion
16:00 - 17:00 GMT
Saturday, 9 January

Our Branches & Roots: Building Solidarity & Racial Justice in Our Movements

Horticultural, agricultural and environmental professions are some of the least diverse in Britain. In this session we will profile and celebrate the growing network of land workers, earth stewards, and nature connectors in the UK. We will discuss intersectional solidarity, social justice in food production spaces and the breaking of barriers impeding our collective liberation.

Farm Practice
Panel Discussion

Speakers

Mulugeta Worku

Dr. Lovemore C. Gwiriri

Guru Thiru

Chair

Prof Mark Eisler

Languages

English, Français

16:00 - 17:00 GMT
Saturday, 9 January

Goats: The Hidden Transformers

Goats play a transformative role around the world, particularly in harsh environments - reflecting climate, vegetation or conflict. They transform the most indigestible plant material into meat, milk and skins and are also increasing the economic independence and resilience of rural women.

Rothamsted is researching the role of goats in smallholder systems in Malawi and Botswana - focused on nutrition, socioeconomics and parasitology (through targeted selective treatment using metabolites from bioactive plants). Goats have always been a priority for Farm Africa, providing them to vulnerable women living in rural eastern Africa - supported by animal health and business development services, empowering them to increase incomes and improve their families' nutrition.

Meanwhile, in the UK, Bristol’s Street Goat connects families and individuals with the joys of working with animals and nature - increasing understanding of their food. Local people collectively manage and care for them in urban areas, producing sustainable and healthy animal food products reared on overgrown and unusable urban land.